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1877 History of La Salle County Illinois

Sketch of the Pioneer Settlers - Fall River

Fall River embraces that part of Township 33, Range 4, lying south of the Illinois river. It derives its name from the grand rapids of the Illinois, which lie along its northern boundary. Until 1863 it formed a part of the town of Grand Rapids, which was also named from the same natural feature. It embraces considerable fertile bottom lands along the river. The south bluff of the river, extending along its entire northern boundary, is a marked object in its topography; covered with timber, with points extending back into the prairie, and having the Covell Creek timber on the southwest; all its people have easy access to that important article. The prairie is rolling, and as fertile as that of its sister towns.

The first settler in the limits of the present town was James Galloway; he came from Pennsylvania to Ohio, near Sandusky, and remained there three years; he visited the Illinois river in the fall of 1824, and is said to have spent some months in hunting, trapping, and exploring the country; moved his family to Chicago in 1825, and wintered there; in 1826 he bought a claim on S. 24, T. 3, R. 4, which was first made by a man by the name of Rawson, who sold to Ephraim Sprague, and Sprague sold to Galloway, where he made a home and spent his days. His first wife died in 1830; her children are: George, claimed to be the first white male child born in the county, now living near the old farm; John, died in Missouri; Susan, married Joel Ellis, lives in Chicago; Jane, married Mr. Halloway; Mary, married Mr. Clyburne, and lives in Chicago. Mr. Galloway's second wife was Matilda Stipes; her children are: Archibald, married Mary Dickerman, and lives near the old farm; Marshall, who is a conductor on the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad; Samuel, lives in Michigan; Sarah, married Mr. Pearson, and is living on the old farm; James, is living in the vicinity. Mr. Galloway died in 1863, aged 73 years. His widow died in 1864.

Abraham Trumbo was born in Pendleton County, Va., and resided in Licking County, Ohio, eighteen years; left there for Illinois in November, 1829, with the Green-e Colony. That company crossed White river, in Indiana, in the morning, and Mr. Trumbo arrived on its banks the evening of the same day; it had become swollen during the day so that he was detained four weeks before he could cross. He went to Sangamon County, where he wintered, and reached La Salle County in the spring of 1830; he first bought a claim of William Richey on S. 17, and afterwards purchased on Sees. 14 and 22. He was the first Supervisor of the town. He died Oct. 7th, 1865, aged 73 years, and his wife, Esther Dyer, died in April, 1865. His children were: Jane, who died in 1848; Ambrose, married Casbia Gentleman, is a wealthy farmer on the old farm; Margaret, married John S. Armstrong, is living in Mission; Rebecca, married Samuel Parr, and lives in Rutland; Jackson, died of cholera in 1848.

John Brown, from Missouri, came in 1829; settled at the ford of the Illinois river, two miles above Ottawa, which bears his name. He was drowned in sight of his house while crossing the Illinois in returning from the land sale in 1835. The family left in 1841.

John Powers, from Bridgewater, Mass., came to Southern Illinois, and from there here in 1834, and settled on Section 26. He was the first Justice of the Peace in the town. He died in 1863; his widow, Nancy Ford, from Litchfield, Ct., still survives. He left six children: Charles R. Powers, lived near the old homestead, has removed West; Aaron P., is in Grundy County; John H.; Mary, married; Lucy, married Andrew Greenless; Lura, married Samuel Hammond. The family have all left the county.

Reeder Galloway, brother of James, married Rachel Stipes; died long ago, leaving one son John R., of Marseilles.

Samuel R. Lewis is of Quaker parentage; his parents, Jehu Lewis, and Rachel Mills, from Penn., settled in Putnam County, in 1833. Samuel R., with his wife, Ann Harley, removed to Section 21 in Fall River, in 1843. He held the office of County Treasurer two successive terms; has been Supervisor of the town several terms, and is now chairman of the County Board. His children are: William, who married Ellen Eichelberger, lives in Grand Rapids; Edward C, educated for and admitted to the bar — he married Nellie Armstrong, and took charge of the large farm and stock business left by his wife’s father, J. W. Armstrong; Charles, has just graduated from Oberlin College, and is now in the law office of Lawrence, Campbell & Lawrence, of Chicago; S. Morris is in Chicago University. Mrs. Lewis, mother of Samuel R., died in 1874; her son buried her beside her husband in the Quaker buryingground at Clear Creek, Putnam County.

William Gentleman, from Vermont, settled in the town on Section 18, in 1834, and is still on the old farm; has buried two wives, and has four children: Eliza; William, has recently graduated at Cornell University; James; and one younger daughter.

Patrick Harrigan, from Ireland to Boston, and came here in 1836; died 1872; widow, and oldest daughter, live in South Ottawa.

A. M. Ebersol, son of Joseph Ebersol, came with his father’s family in 1834. He was married to Miss C. C. Whittlesey, by the Rev. Owen Lovejoy, the renowned abolitionist, in 1844, having made a journey to Princeton to have the ceremony performed by that distinguished man. Mr. Ebersol has been an active citizen; he has been Superintendent of a Sunday School twenty -three years; Justice of the Peace; Elder in the Presbyterian Church; Town Clerk twelve years, and Secretary of the Old Settlers' Association. He has six children: Calistine and Elizabeth, are at home; Lelia, married Lewis Hodgson, went West; James, married Miss Tryon, and lives in Ford County; B. Corinne, wife of Mr. Coleman, lives near home; Alice, married Charles T. Ferrel.

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