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Biography - JOHN WALTER

An enterprising, straightforward business man of Ottawa is he of whom this sketch is penned. He comes of sturdy, industrious German ancestry, and possesses the sterling traits of character for which the sons of the Fatherland are celebrated. Kindness and generosity and a sincere desire to be of service to his fellow men makes him win friends wherever he goes.

John Walter, Sr., was born in Germany, and about half a century ago, when he was a young man, he left the scenes and friends of his childhood to found a new home in the United States. Coming to Ottawa, he subsequently married here Miss Julia Leix, and seven children blessed their union. Four of the number are deceased; Julia is a resident of Ottawa, and Joseph is a resident of Chicago.

John Walter, our subject, was born in this town over twoscore years ago, the date being September 15, 1858. His entire life has been spent in this place, here he was educated in the public schools, and here he embarked in his successful business career. He served a thorough apprenticeship at the hardware business, learning the trade of manufacturing sheet-iron implements, and follows both branches of enterprise. He is the owner of a large and well stocked hardware store, situated at No. 312 Main street.

In 1885 Mr. Walter married Miss Louisa Schomas, the daughter of Charles Schomas, deceased. The sons and daughters who grace the union of our subject and wife are named respectively Joseph, Carl, Julia, Louisa, and Helen.

In political affairs, Mr. Walter is an ally of the Democratic party. In the local fraternities he is associated with the Uniformed Rank of the Knights of Pythias, the German Benevolent Society and the Pleasant Evening Club. He contributes liberally to various charitable organizations and favors local improvements and everything tending to promote the beauty and desirability of Ottawa as a place of residence or investment.

Extracted by Norma Hass from Biographical and Genealogical Record of LaSalle County, Illinois published in 1900, volume 1, pages 215-216.

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