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Biography - OLE ERICKSON

Miller township, LaSalle county, Illinois, includes among its wellknown citizens the subject of this sketch, Ole Erickson, who has for three years figured in the public capacity of road commissioner, and who during this time has not only extended his acquaintance throughout the township. but also has won the confidence and favor of those with whom he has come in contact.

As his name suggests, Mr. Erickson is a Norwegian. He was born in Norway, January 12, 1852, a son of George and Winnie (Clarkson) Erickson, who were the parents of seven children. Two of this number, Rjestine and Maria, are deceased. Those living are Ole, the direct subject of this review; Julia Jacobson, a resident of Lee county; and Bertha, Carrie and Mina, in Norway.

On his emigration to this country Ole Erickson located first in Fillmore comity, Minnesota, where he remained for five months, at the end of that time coming to LaSalle county, Illinois, which has since been his home. In 1879 he purchased his present farm, one hundred and twenty acres, in Miller township, which he has improved with a modern residence, other good buildings, etc., and has since that date devoted his energies to the cultivation of his broad acres.

The same year he purchased his farm Mr. Erickson took to himself a wife. Mrs. Erickson, formerly Miss Caroline Anderson, is a native of Miller township, LaSalle county, and a daughter of Andrew Anderson, deceased. They have five children: Celia, Florence, Olive, George and Alice. Also they have three children deceased, all having died in infancy. Their daughter. Miss Olive, is an accomplished musician, and Celia is a successful teacher.

Mr. Erickson is a Democrat. Besides filling the office of road commissioner, above referred to, he has for nine years been a member of the school board. He is identified with the Lutheran church, while his wife belongs to the Church of Latter Day Saints.

Extracted by Norma Hass from Biographical and Genealogical Record of LaSalle County, Illinois published in 1900, volume 1, pages 306-307.

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